FAQ: The Editing Process

Your book has been acquired—hooray! Next comes weeks and weeks of shaping and editing the novel as you work with your editor. No matter what the manuscript looks like at the time of acquisition, this process is essential to the book publishing cycle (and it’s the reason I have a job!). Check out the answers to frequently asked questions about editing below.

1. How long does the editing process take? This varies from book to book. On average, I try to schedule a minimum six months of editing time, which includes my macro edits as well as copyedits and proofreads.  Continue reading

The Freelancer Cheat Sheet: Everything You Need to Know About Freelance Writers and Editors

You’ve probably heard of most of these professions: ghostwriter, book doctor, coauthor, editor. But what do they all mean and how do you know who is right for your project? Read on to see who, what, where, when and why, for the four main freelance jobs.

Who: Book Doctor

What: A book doctor is a writer/editor that is approached by a publisher or author with a troubled manuscript. These people are usually seasoned professionals with excellent reputations and connections in their field and in the world of publishing.

Where: It can be tricky to find a good book doctor. Your publishing house will often be the one to approach an industry professional for help. However, you can look around online to see if there are doctors for hire. Be sure to do your research thoroughly, as some people like to bandy the term about.

When: In many cases, a book doctor is used when a manuscript needs major reworking, not just editing. Book doctoring can happen with promising or famous authors who just haven’t turned in the manuscript an editor hoped for, though individuals can also seek the advice of a book doctor.

Why: Book doctors are aptly named: they fix up, clean up, and set a book to rights. This can be a difficult process, and will require a lot more work on the part of the author, but the results are worth it.  Continue reading